The answer to yesterday’s Hump Day Head Scratcher:

“I went to the railway station followed by two photographers who, with Polaroid cameras, documented by journey moment by moment. They photographed me while I was getting my ticket, buying a newspaper, having my shoes shined, getting on the train, getting off and taking a taxi. Once at the Galleria 2000 I started putting up the pictures on the wall and I put my ticket in the box attached to the opposite wall especially for this purpose. The two photographers carried on taking pictures and the new ones were then added to the others. In this way, the exhibition was self-constructing, self-generating. Whoever came to see the exhibition was immediately incorporated, multiplied, recorded, caught in unrepeatable instants, and this destroyed the space of contemplation to open it up to action. At a certain point I took back my ticket and left.”

Franco Vaccari
Exhibition in real time n.2 Journey + rite, 1971

The answer to yesterday’s Hump Day Head Scratcher:

“I went to the railway station followed by two photographers who, with Polaroid cameras, documented by journey moment by moment. They photographed me while I was getting my ticket, buying a newspaper, having my shoes shined, getting on the train, getting off and taking a taxi. Once at the Galleria 2000 I started putting up the pictures on the wall and I put my ticket in the box attached to the opposite wall especially for this purpose. The two photographers carried on taking pictures and the new ones were then added to the others. In this way, the exhibition was self-constructing, self-generating. Whoever came to see the exhibition was immediately incorporated, multiplied, recorded, caught in unrepeatable instants, and this destroyed the space of contemplation to open it up to action. At a certain point I took back my ticket and left.”

Franco Vaccari
Exhibition in real time n.2 Journey + rite, 1971

Calling all image-text artists!

An exciting opportunity for five Junior Fellows to participate in a 3-day Image-Text Symposium at Ithaca College from June 11-14, 2014.

The symposium brings together eleven fellows: 6 nationally and internationally recognized practitioners – artists, writers, publishers, editors – and 5 early career artists, for a collaboration at the intersection of photography and writing in contemporary art and publishing. Across three days of experimentation, adventure and creative exchange, the group will develop material for an original art book publication to initiate an independent press associated with Ithaca College. This is not a scholarly event, but a collaborative encounter, in part a brainstorming session towards launching an image-text MFA program, and an opportunity to work with and learn from an emerging artist-and-writer community.

This year’s participating Senior Fellows are: Bruno Ceschel, Jason Fulford, Jen Hofer, Claudia Rankine, Hannah Whitaker and Matvei Yankelevich. The directors are Nicholas Muellner and Catherine Taylor.  You can read more about them, the symposium, and the application process here: http://www.imagetextithaca.com

Junior Fellows will be selected by the program directors and senior fellows, through an international call for entries. Selected fellows will attend the three day event free of charge, with lodging and meals provided by Ithaca College.

Junior Fellows may be photographers, writers, or artists working in both disciplines. Early career artists as well as advanced students are eligible to apply.

From The Library: The Secret Seller by Betty Jean Lifton (1968)

“Why are you sad?” asked a voice next to him.  Looking up, Ken saw the strangest little man. He was not like anyone Ken had ever seen before. But something about the way he smiled made Ken feel he was a friend. “Because I have no secret,” he told the little man. “Everyone has a secret but me.” 

“How lucky we should meet,” said his new friend. “It so happens that I am a secret seller.”

From The Library: The Secret Seller by Betty Jean Lifton (1968)

“Why are you sad?” asked a voice next to him. Looking up, Ken saw the strangest little man. He was not like anyone Ken had ever seen before. But something about the way he smiled made Ken feel he was a friend. “Because I have no secret,” he told the little man. “Everyone has a secret but me.”

“How lucky we should meet,” said his new friend. “It so happens that I am a secret seller.”

From the library: $19.84 by William Wegman

“I was born on a tiny cot in south western Mass. During world II. A frail and sickly child I turned to photography to escape my loneliness and isolation. As a toddler my Hasselblad became my best friend but after a while I got sicky of photography and I started to draw and make watercolors. My tiny hands sticky from sweets stuck to my brushes like birds to a feather. But we were very poor. Although I was popular my work didn’t sell all that well and I refused to compromise. Post war Europe was a shambles and we had entered the McCarthy era. My dog died. I had no choice but to engage and exploit women photographically. Although I am physically well and financially secure I feel guilty.” William Wegman, 1984

From the library: $19.84 by William Wegman

“I was born on a tiny cot in south western Mass. During world II. A frail and sickly child I turned to photography to escape my loneliness and isolation. As a toddler my Hasselblad became my best friend but after a while I got sicky of photography and I started to draw and make watercolors. My tiny hands sticky from sweets stuck to my brushes like birds to a feather. But we were very poor. Although I was popular my work didn’t sell all that well and I refused to compromise. Post war Europe was a shambles and we had entered the McCarthy era. My dog died. I had no choice but to engage and exploit women photographically. Although I am physically well and financially secure I feel guilty.” William Wegman, 1984

Siren?

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In anticipation of the opening of my exhibition at Weinstein Gallery this Friday featuring projects from the last ten years, a number of people have asked, “What is Siren?”

My last major project was Broken Manual. The subject of these photographs was entirely male. Anxious to photograph something besides bearded loners, I started a project on women with pictures made in Rome, Los Angeles, Moscow, New Orleans and Minneapolis. But before completing this project, Brad Zellar and I started The LBM Dispatch.  As a consequence, this work is still on the back burner with no plans for future publication.

cover

However, I have already published one book from this project: La Belle Dame Sans Merci. The publisher, Punctum Press, has recently uncovered a box of the Italian edition (with an inserted English translation). We are selling signed copies for $250. Purchase yours here:

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A meditation on John Keats, Rome, pale men, beautiful women and pineapples by the photographer Alec Soth.

La Belle Dame Sans Merci
by Alec Soth
Curated by Marco Delogu
with an essay by Francesco Zanot
52 pages, 12.5” x 15.25”
published 2011 by Punctum Press
ISBN: 978-88-95410-31-9

Edition of 500 (250 Italian / 250 English)

Signed Italian Edition (with English translation insert:
$250

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Eight years ago I had the wonderful experience of photographing the historic Lothlorien Co-op in Madison Wisconsin. Last September, there was a major fire that left the building uninhabitable and displaced the 30 adults and 4 children living there at the time. Supporters of the co-op are raising money to prevent the building from being sold to a developer. You can contribute to their cause at http://www.gofundme.com/SaveLothlorien

Eight years ago I had the wonderful experience of photographing the historic Lothlorien Co-op in Madison Wisconsin. Last September, there was a major fire that left the building uninhabitable and displaced the 30 adults and 4 children living there at the time. Supporters of the co-op are raising money to prevent the building from being sold to a developer. You can contribute to their cause at http://www.gofundme.com/SaveLothlorien